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2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 138 words || 
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1. Rothwangl, Sepp. "The Echo of the Great-Year Doctrine and the 6000-Year Period in Kepler’s Calculation of the Creation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p929270_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In 1596 Johannes Kepler wrote Mysterium Cosmographicum. He draw therein a horoscope representing the conjunction of creation, in order to harmonize it with the heliocentric world view of Copernicus. With this idea, Kepler and Copernicus are closely aligned with the doctrine of the Great Year, which Kepler tried to bring into symmetrical harmony with heliocentrism as a graphical representation of his creational notion readily illustrates with the Earth in the middle between the other celestial objects. Kepler’s “best warrantors” is evidently the Protestant reformer Luther. Kepler therefore, based upon planetary periods, created a date of creation of the world some 4000 years before Christ. In his work “De temporis initio; De mundi aetate” he combined the seven-day-concept and the fictitious date of Christ’s birth in similar way as in 6th century did Dionysius Exiguus by inventing Anno Domini.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Tsalas, Nike., Paulus, Markus. and Sodian, Beate. "Metacognitive spacing decisions in 7-year olds, 10-year olds and adults and the effect of self-feedback" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955856_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The spacing effect is the phenomenon that temporally interrupted studying improves memory performance (Ebbinghaus, 1964). Within a metacognitive context, research suggests that adults but not first graders use their metacognitions to guide their spacing choices (Son, 2004;Son, 2005). This is in line with findings that children have problems to translate their metacognitive monitoring into appropriate control strategies (Dufresne & Kobasigawa, 1989). In the current study we investigated whether self-feedback gained from a repeated study trial would influence participants' learning behavior. Previous studies suggest that repeated study trials can improve metacognitive monitoring (Koriat, 1997). Yet, it would be important to examine in greater detail whether also metacognitive control benefits from these experiences and furthermore, whether also children incorporate such feedback into their monitoring and control behaviour.
We tested 7-year olds (N= 31) 10-year olds (N=27,) and adults (N=29). Participants were presented with 2 learning blocks of picture pairs (easy, medium, difficult). They had to make Judgments of Learning (JoL) to predict their future memory performance and had to decide whether to space, mass or terminate their study on an item-by-item basis. Participants experienced a recall phase after the first learning block to gain performance feedback on the outcome of their monitoring and strategy choices before the second learning block.
Results showed that even young children used their metacognitions to guide their spacing decisions, however in a less differentiated way than adults (Figure 1). We further examined whether participants' monitoring and control changed in the second learning block. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Learning Block and relative performance prediction (gamma correlations between JoL and performance) as within subject factor and Age Group as a between subjects factor, yielded a main effect of Learning Block F (1, 71) =7, 71 p<. 05. Participants’ gamma correlations were stronger in the second learning block (M=0,796) than in the first learning block (M=0,620) suggesting that they improved their performance prediction in the second block. Planned post-hoc analysis for each age group revealed that this effect was driven by changes in performance predictions made by 7-year olds (Table 1).
A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Learning Block, Item difficulty and Strategy as within subjects factors and Age Group as a between subject factor yielded a three way interaction between Learning Block, Difficulty and Strategy F (2.99, 336) =3.47, p<.05, η2 =.04. Paired sample t-tests of strategy choice per item difficulty for both learning blocks and across age groups showed that more easy items of the first (37.74%) than of the second learning block (24.71%) were chosen to be seen again later (all ps <.05). Furthermore, the option to terminate study was chosen for more easy items of the second (69.63%) than of the first learning block (57.75%) (all ps <.05).
The current study showed that already 7-year-olds use their metacognitions to guide their spacing choices and that the monitoring and control of participants of all age groups changed in a repeated learning trial after receiving self-feedback on their previous performance.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Leupp, Katrina. "More Traditional Each Year? Earnings and Married Mothers’ Employment Hours over the Childrearing Years" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255763_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The tendency for socio-economic privilege to increase women’s labor force participation calls for greater attention to the employment hours of married mothers, for whom spouses’ earnings may reduce the financial incentives to employment. This study examines how women’s own earnings and the earnings of their spouse prior to the parenthood shape employment hours for married women with children, and whether the link between mother’s employment hours and pre-parenthood earnings changes as their children age. Results from 1979 to 2007 data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort indicate that women’s own earnings and the earnings of their spouse prior to their first birth have competing effects on mothers’ employment hours. As their firstborn child ages from zero to nine, the effects of mothers’ own pre-birth earnings on their employment hours weaken. In contrast, the effects of their husbands’ pre-birth earnings magnify the longer they are parents. Results suggest that the determinants of mothers’ employment hours become increasingly gender-traditional over their first ten years of parenthood. Follow-up analyses will compare results from the NLSY79 cohort to the employment hours of the NLSY97 cohort to assess the relevancy of findings to the cohort currently embarking on their parenting years.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Min, Jie. "Between-Year and Within-Year School Mobility: Different Effects by Race/Ethnicity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1249724_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates the effects of school mobility on the academic achievement of different racial/ethnic groups in four cohorts of students in a very large urban school district. In this study, I distinguish within-year and between-year mobility and, most importantly, accounts for all schools students attended. Using a multiple membership model (MMM), the findings confirm that for all student groups, academic achievement is affected more by within-year school mobility than between-year school mobility. However, Black students have the highest mobility rates, both for between- and within-year mobility. In addition, although Asian-American students achieve higher reading and math scores on average than other groups, they experience a stronger negative impact from within-year school mobility than any other group. This finding suggests that Asian Americans are a diverse ethnic group in terms of socioeconomic status, a result contrary to the “model minority” image. In one part of my study, I found that while some Asian-American students such as Chinese and South Koreans outperform white students in academic performance, those from Nepal, Bhutan, and a few other Asian regions fall behind other students. This conclusion contains implications for policy making and suggestions for future research.

2018 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Fillippino, Tonja., Towery, Ron., McMurtry, Zelda., Jones, Jo. and Hiatt, Sylvia. "One year later....moving toward a year-long internship." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Flamingo Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, Feb 16, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1293414_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presenters will address the results of the transition from a semester long internship to a semi-year long internship.

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