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2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
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1. Ware, Felicity. "“It’s hard being a young parent, it’s even harder being a young Māori parent” Young Indigenous parents experiences in NZ" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109682_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The voices and experiences of young indigenous parents are lacking in research, particularly in Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, policy has been informed by mostly non-indigenous, older, ‘professionals’ who continue to frame early childbearing and ethnicity in terms of risk factors and negative outcomes for mother and child. To counter the problematisation and stigmatisation of early indigenous childbearing and privilege indigenous perspectives, this research focused on young Māori parents’ experiences of support during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Kaupapa Kōrero, a qualitative narrative-based approach was used to gather, present and analyse their perspectives. This approach was situated in an indigenizing research tradition and informed by Māori knowledge and oral traditions. Kaupapa Kōrero applies a whakapapa (kinship) framework to the analysis of the interviews. This approach identifies individual stories and demonstrates how they are located within layers of interrelated narratives that influence the experience of parenting for young Māori. These layers illuminate how young parents construct their own changing identity (Tōna ake ao), link themselves to others (Tōna whānau), link their narrative to Māori culture, identity and parenting (Te Ao Māori), and locate themselves in the wider social, economic, historical and political context (Te Ao whānui). Using this approach revealed the intersection of culture and early parenting that may otherwise be overlooked. These insights are invaluable for informing policy, research, service provision and practice that enhance the health and wellbeing of young Māori parents and their children.

2013 - International Communication Association Words: 215 words || 
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2. Sloam, James. "The Outraged Young: Young Europeans, Civic Engagement, and the Social Media in a Time of Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, <Not Available>. 2018-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634804_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In almost all established democracies engagement in traditional political institutions has declined in recent decades, leading to what some have seen as a crisis in citizenship. This trend is most striking amongst young people, who have become increasingly alienated from mainstream electoral politics in Europe. At the same time, young Europeans have become increasingly marginalised by and from public policy since the onset of the global financial crisis: from worsening levels of child poverty, to spiralling youth unemployment, to cuts in youth services and education budgets, to increased university tuition fees. Nevertheless, there is overwhelming evidence to show that young people are not apathetic about ‘politics’ – they have their own views and engage in democracy in a wide variety of ways relevant to their everyday lives. In this context, the rise and proliferation of protest politics amongst young Europeans is hardly surprising. Indeed, youth activism has become a major feature of the European political landscape: from the Occupy movement against the excesses of global capitalism, to mass demonstrations of the ‘outraged young’ (the ‘indignados’) against political corruption and youth unemployment, to growth in support for ‘pirate parties’ in defence of individual freedom. This paper will examine the role that the social media has played in the development of these protest movements across the continent.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 154 words || 
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3. Bronner, Laura. and Ifkovits, David. "How Young is too Young? Voting at 16 and Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is the appropriate age for young people to participate in the political process? The debate over whether the voting age ought to be lowered to 16 is ongoing and has, in countries such as the UK, been marked by claims that these young voters might change political outcomes. In particular, 16-year-olds are held to be lower-information and lower-interest voters, making them more susceptible to anti-system or extremist rhetoric. But do 16-year-olds actually behave differently than 18-year-olds? We exploit the exogenous variation in voting eligibility by examining the effect of Austria’s 2007 law to enfranchise 16-year-olds on political participation in the 2013 election. In order to distinguish the effect of voting at 16 from the established effect of voting habituation, we employ a difference-in-discontinuities design comparing those voters who had been around the new eligibility threshold, 16, in the 2008 election, with those around the old threshold, 18, in the previous election in 2006.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6609 words || 
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4. Sharkey, Patrick. "The Geography of Young Adulthood: Persistence and Change in the Residential Contexts of Young Adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Relatively neglected in the literature on young adulthood is a thorough consideration of changes in geography and changes in the neighborhood environment occurring during this period. In the current analysis I focus attention on a specific element of the transition to adulthood: the move out of the parental home. Based on a sample of young adults living in Chicago in the late 1990s, I find that white and nonwhite young adults in Chicago approach the “frontier of adulthood” from severely unequal environments. Whereas the typical white young adult lives in an economically diverse neighborhood as she prepares to forge her own path, the typical African-American lives in a segregated neighborhood consisting mostly of neighbors at the bottom of the income distribution and few at the top. Racial inequalities in residential environments that are present among young adults in Chicago appear to persist, for the most part, through the period of young adulthood. There is little evidence that young adults are able to forge new paths and disperse across the country; instead, through the early years of young adulthood most either remain in the parental home or stay within the city in neighborhoods that closely resemble those in which they were raised. An exception occurs among young adults who leave home and leave Chicago. Whereas nonwhites who leave home and leave the city enter more affluent, less segregated neighborhoods, whites who do so enter neighborhoods that are more economically diverse and less advantaged than their neighborhoods of origin.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 8990 words || 
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5. Zhang, Yan Bing. and Wang, Kai. "Stereotype Traits of Chinese Young Adults: Young, Middle-Aged, and Older Persons’ Descriptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93081_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examined stereotype traits of Chinese young adults generated by 60 young (M age = 24.78), 60 middle-aged (M age = 46.38), and 60 older Chinese adults (M age = 66.50). Trait lists were compared across age groups and to Western traits reported in earlier research (Matheson, Collins & Kuehne, 2000; Chasteen, Schwarz, & Park, 2002). Results indicated that Chinese participants had multiple stereotypes and mixed perceptions of the young. While considerable overlap was observed between stereotype traits generated by these Chinese participants and those from earlier studies with Western participants (e.g., energetic, ambitious, lazy, and reckless), unique Chinese traits (e.g., open-minded, filial, hedonistic, and individualistic) associated with young adults were also identified. Whereas the middle-aged and older participants listed an equal number of positive and negative traits, the young participants generated significantly more negative traits than positive ones about their own age group. Discussion focuses on the impact of modernization and cultural change on perceptions of young adults in the Chinese society.

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