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2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
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1. Ware, Felicity. "“It’s hard being a young parent, it’s even harder being a young Māori parent” Young Indigenous parents experiences in NZ" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109682_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The voices and experiences of young indigenous parents are lacking in research, particularly in Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, policy has been informed by mostly non-indigenous, older, ‘professionals’ who continue to frame early childbearing and ethnicity in terms of risk factors and negative outcomes for mother and child. To counter the problematisation and stigmatisation of early indigenous childbearing and privilege indigenous perspectives, this research focused on young Māori parents’ experiences of support during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Kaupapa Kōrero, a qualitative narrative-based approach was used to gather, present and analyse their perspectives. This approach was situated in an indigenizing research tradition and informed by Māori knowledge and oral traditions. Kaupapa Kōrero applies a whakapapa (kinship) framework to the analysis of the interviews. This approach identifies individual stories and demonstrates how they are located within layers of interrelated narratives that influence the experience of parenting for young Māori. These layers illuminate how young parents construct their own changing identity (Tōna ake ao), link themselves to others (Tōna whānau), link their narrative to Māori culture, identity and parenting (Te Ao Māori), and locate themselves in the wider social, economic, historical and political context (Te Ao whānui). Using this approach revealed the intersection of culture and early parenting that may otherwise be overlooked. These insights are invaluable for informing policy, research, service provision and practice that enhance the health and wellbeing of young Māori parents and their children.

2016 - LRA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Ash, Gwynne. and Saunders, Jane. "From “I don’t like Mondays” to “Pumped Up Kicks”: School shootings in young adult fiction and young adults’ lives, 1977-2016" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA Annual Conference, OMNI Nashville, Nashville, Tennessee, Nov 29, 2016 Online <DOCUMENT/PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1145058_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 26 words || 
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3. Bronner, Laura. and Ifkovits, David. "How Young is too Young to Vote?: Electoral Habit Formation Among 16-year-Olds in Austria" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1351415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We use an eligibility-based regression discontinuity design show that in Austria, a 2008 reform enfranchising 16-year-olds resulted in habituation effects increasing both turnout and partisan polarization.

2011 - 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 293 words || 
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4. Crider, Juanita. "All the Women are Young, All the Young are Sexual, But Some of Us are Grey: Sexual Agency and the Older Single Black Woman in Contemporary Black Feminist Literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493139_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: June Jordan in her essay “A New Politics of Sexuality,” describes sexuality as a political space where “human conflict” is perhaps staged more than anywhere else in the world (407). Jordan extends her discussion of sexual politics by stating “ The Politics of Sexuality therefore subsumes all of the different ways in which some of us seek to dictate to others of us what we should do, what we should desire, what we should dream about, and how we should behave ourselves, generally”(408). Although Jordan’s essay challenges the oppression of bisexuality I believe her argument extends to the alienation and silencing of the aging single black women as a sexual and sensual being. In my paper I plan to use the novels Sexual Healing by Jill Nelson and Maker of Saints by Thulani Davis to analyze the relationship between aging and sensuality among single black women 40 and older. Some of the questions I will explore include: How does society dictate to single black women in this age range (and in general) how they should engage with the world of touch and sensuality? How do single black women reconcile their aging bodies and sexual needs in a youth driven culture? How does memory of youth and a youthful being (and body) serve as a vehicle for sexual agency or disrupt agency for these women? Additionally how can single black women past forty be sexual and sensual outside of the erotic? I will argue that there is a void in the inclusion of aging and single black women's sexuality in not only contemporary black feminist literature but in black feminist scholarship and criticism which is in opposition to the intersectional analysis encouraged by scholars currently in the field.

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