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2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
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1. Ware, Felicity. "“It’s hard being a young parent, it’s even harder being a young Māori parent” Young Indigenous parents experiences in NZ" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109682_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The voices and experiences of young indigenous parents are lacking in research, particularly in Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, policy has been informed by mostly non-indigenous, older, ‘professionals’ who continue to frame early childbearing and ethnicity in terms of risk factors and negative outcomes for mother and child. To counter the problematisation and stigmatisation of early indigenous childbearing and privilege indigenous perspectives, this research focused on young Māori parents’ experiences of support during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Kaupapa Kōrero, a qualitative narrative-based approach was used to gather, present and analyse their perspectives. This approach was situated in an indigenizing research tradition and informed by Māori knowledge and oral traditions. Kaupapa Kōrero applies a whakapapa (kinship) framework to the analysis of the interviews. This approach identifies individual stories and demonstrates how they are located within layers of interrelated narratives that influence the experience of parenting for young Māori. These layers illuminate how young parents construct their own changing identity (Tōna ake ao), link themselves to others (Tōna whānau), link their narrative to Māori culture, identity and parenting (Te Ao Māori), and locate themselves in the wider social, economic, historical and political context (Te Ao whānui). Using this approach revealed the intersection of culture and early parenting that may otherwise be overlooked. These insights are invaluable for informing policy, research, service provision and practice that enhance the health and wellbeing of young Māori parents and their children.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 8990 words || 
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2. Zhang, Yan Bing. and Wang, Kai. "Stereotype Traits of Chinese Young Adults: Young, Middle-Aged, and Older Persons’ Descriptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93081_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examined stereotype traits of Chinese young adults generated by 60 young (M age = 24.78), 60 middle-aged (M age = 46.38), and 60 older Chinese adults (M age = 66.50). Trait lists were compared across age groups and to Western traits reported in earlier research (Matheson, Collins & Kuehne, 2000; Chasteen, Schwarz, & Park, 2002). Results indicated that Chinese participants had multiple stereotypes and mixed perceptions of the young. While considerable overlap was observed between stereotype traits generated by these Chinese participants and those from earlier studies with Western participants (e.g., energetic, ambitious, lazy, and reckless), unique Chinese traits (e.g., open-minded, filial, hedonistic, and individualistic) associated with young adults were also identified. Whereas the middle-aged and older participants listed an equal number of positive and negative traits, the young participants generated significantly more negative traits than positive ones about their own age group. Discussion focuses on the impact of modernization and cultural change on perceptions of young adults in the Chinese society.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6064 words || 
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3. Bespinar-Ekici, Fatma. "Young Women’s Citizenship Experiences in Southeastern Turkey: Lack of Independence and Resources for Employed Young Women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p412463_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines young women’s citizenship experiences in South East Turkey. It focuses on how triple barriers resulted in gender, age and regional inequalities operate in access to citizenship rights. To be young woman in an economically and socially less developed and relatively more traditional and conservative region leads to various obstacles in this particular group’s access to citizenship rights. This paper, by using theoretical approaches of women, youth and citizenship literature, examines young women’s own citizenship experiences. Young women’s citizenship experiences are examined by looking at three different dimensions of citizenship, namely rights and responsibilities, access, and feelings of belonging. This paper argues that young women, who are living in South East regions of Turkey, experience various levels of structural and cultural barriers in their entitlements to social, political and economic rights. Young women’s access to employment and other social rights are examined based on the a quantitative and qualitative research conducted in eight cities –Adıyaman, Batman, Diyarbakır, Gaziantep, Kilis, Mardin, Siirt, Şırnak- in this region between April and November 2009.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 154 words || 
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4. Bronner, Laura. and Ifkovits, David. "How Young is too Young? Voting at 16 and Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is the appropriate age for young people to participate in the political process? The debate over whether the voting age ought to be lowered to 16 is ongoing and has, in countries such as the UK, been marked by claims that these young voters might change political outcomes. In particular, 16-year-olds are held to be lower-information and lower-interest voters, making them more susceptible to anti-system or extremist rhetoric. But do 16-year-olds actually behave differently than 18-year-olds? We exploit the exogenous variation in voting eligibility by examining the effect of Austria’s 2007 law to enfranchise 16-year-olds on political participation in the 2013 election. In order to distinguish the effect of voting at 16 from the established effect of voting habituation, we employ a difference-in-discontinuities design comparing those voters who had been around the new eligibility threshold, 16, in the 2008 election, with those around the old threshold, 18, in the previous election in 2006.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5091 words || 
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5. Kaufhold, Kelly. "Young Adults Matter: A survey of television journalists on content, news presentation and young adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p272062_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A national survey of 322 television and newspaper journalists found that only one in 20 considered those over 60 their most important audience. Nearly three in four journalists said it is important to present news to it appeals to young adults and nine in ten said young adults prefer online news to print. Only 7% said young adults won’t follow the news. Significant differences emerged between broadcast and print journalists, and between reporters and others.

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