Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 3,254 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 651 - Next  Jump:
2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
Info
1. Ware, Felicity. "“It’s hard being a young parent, it’s even harder being a young Māori parent” Young Indigenous parents experiences in NZ" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109682_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The voices and experiences of young indigenous parents are lacking in research, particularly in Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, policy has been informed by mostly non-indigenous, older, ‘professionals’ who continue to frame early childbearing and ethnicity in terms of risk factors and negative outcomes for mother and child. To counter the problematisation and stigmatisation of early indigenous childbearing and privilege indigenous perspectives, this research focused on young Māori parents’ experiences of support during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Kaupapa Kōrero, a qualitative narrative-based approach was used to gather, present and analyse their perspectives. This approach was situated in an indigenizing research tradition and informed by Māori knowledge and oral traditions. Kaupapa Kōrero applies a whakapapa (kinship) framework to the analysis of the interviews. This approach identifies individual stories and demonstrates how they are located within layers of interrelated narratives that influence the experience of parenting for young Māori. These layers illuminate how young parents construct their own changing identity (Tōna ake ao), link themselves to others (Tōna whānau), link their narrative to Māori culture, identity and parenting (Te Ao Māori), and locate themselves in the wider social, economic, historical and political context (Te Ao whānui). Using this approach revealed the intersection of culture and early parenting that may otherwise be overlooked. These insights are invaluable for informing policy, research, service provision and practice that enhance the health and wellbeing of young Māori parents and their children.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 92 words || 
Info
2. Bailey, Maldine. "Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System: How Young is too Young?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p576558_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With high profile cases such as Florida's Christian Fernandez, the public's attention has been focused on kids who kill. Although violent crime is down across the board, the youth of America are more at-risk of ending up in adult courtrooms than ever before and those cases receive full media coverage. This research seeks to determine if the on-going changes to juvenile laws, to shift more defendants to adult courts, are to deter juvenile crime or simply to feed the media and political machine that uses these cases to further their own causes.

2016 - LRA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Ash, Gwynne. and Saunders, Jane. "From “I don’t like Mondays” to “Pumped Up Kicks”: School shootings in young adult fiction and young adults’ lives, 1977-2016" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA Annual Conference, OMNI Nashville, Nashville, Tennessee, Nov 29, 2016 Online <DOCUMENT/PDF>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1145058_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 154 words || 
Info
4. Bronner, Laura. and Ifkovits, David. "How Young is too Young? Voting at 16 and Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-07-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is the appropriate age for young people to participate in the political process? The debate over whether the voting age ought to be lowered to 16 is ongoing and has, in countries such as the UK, been marked by claims that these young voters might change political outcomes. In particular, 16-year-olds are held to be lower-information and lower-interest voters, making them more susceptible to anti-system or extremist rhetoric. But do 16-year-olds actually behave differently than 18-year-olds? We exploit the exogenous variation in voting eligibility by examining the effect of Austria’s 2007 law to enfranchise 16-year-olds on political participation in the 2013 election. In order to distinguish the effect of voting at 16 from the established effect of voting habituation, we employ a difference-in-discontinuities design comparing those voters who had been around the new eligibility threshold, 16, in the 2008 election, with those around the old threshold, 18, in the previous election in 2006.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 651 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy