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2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
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1. Ware, Felicity. "“It’s hard being a young parent, it’s even harder being a young Māori parent” Young Indigenous parents experiences in NZ" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109682_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The voices and experiences of young indigenous parents are lacking in research, particularly in Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, policy has been informed by mostly non-indigenous, older, ‘professionals’ who continue to frame early childbearing and ethnicity in terms of risk factors and negative outcomes for mother and child. To counter the problematisation and stigmatisation of early indigenous childbearing and privilege indigenous perspectives, this research focused on young Māori parents’ experiences of support during pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Kaupapa Kōrero, a qualitative narrative-based approach was used to gather, present and analyse their perspectives. This approach was situated in an indigenizing research tradition and informed by Māori knowledge and oral traditions. Kaupapa Kōrero applies a whakapapa (kinship) framework to the analysis of the interviews. This approach identifies individual stories and demonstrates how they are located within layers of interrelated narratives that influence the experience of parenting for young Māori. These layers illuminate how young parents construct their own changing identity (Tōna ake ao), link themselves to others (Tōna whānau), link their narrative to Māori culture, identity and parenting (Te Ao Māori), and locate themselves in the wider social, economic, historical and political context (Te Ao whānui). Using this approach revealed the intersection of culture and early parenting that may otherwise be overlooked. These insights are invaluable for informing policy, research, service provision and practice that enhance the health and wellbeing of young Māori parents and their children.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 43 words || 
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2. Treiber, Kyle., Roman, Gabriela. and Wikström, Per-Olof. "Do Initial Levels and Changes in Young People’s Prime Propensities and Criminogenic Exposure Explain Young People’s Pathways in Crime (Crime Trajectories)?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1146342_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The aim of this paper is to explore whether young people’s pathways in crime (crime trajectories) can be explained by initial levels and changes in their crime propensities (personal morals, abilities to exercise self-control) and criminogenic exposure (moral contexts encouraging acts of crime).

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 154 words || 
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3. Bronner, Laura. and Ifkovits, David. "How Young is too Young? Voting at 16 and Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is the appropriate age for young people to participate in the political process? The debate over whether the voting age ought to be lowered to 16 is ongoing and has, in countries such as the UK, been marked by claims that these young voters might change political outcomes. In particular, 16-year-olds are held to be lower-information and lower-interest voters, making them more susceptible to anti-system or extremist rhetoric. But do 16-year-olds actually behave differently than 18-year-olds? We exploit the exogenous variation in voting eligibility by examining the effect of Austria’s 2007 law to enfranchise 16-year-olds on political participation in the 2013 election. In order to distinguish the effect of voting at 16 from the established effect of voting habituation, we employ a difference-in-discontinuities design comparing those voters who had been around the new eligibility threshold, 16, in the 2008 election, with those around the old threshold, 18, in the previous election in 2006.

2017 - ASEEES Convention Words: 57 words || 
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4. Klots, Alissa. and Romashova, Maria. "Young Minds - Young Bodies: The Emotional and the Physical in the Late Soviet Discourse on Aging" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1266157_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The paper explores aging as a physical and emotional phenomenon in the late Soviet discourse. It does so by looking at the construction of ‘positive aging’ in Soviet advice brochures from the last years of Khrushchev’s rule and the echo of the virtues of ‘positive aging’ in the private writings of the aging activist Tatiana Ivanova (1898-1968).

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 204 words || 
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5. Cutts, David., Fieldhouse, Edward. and Russell, Andrew. "Young people and voting: the effect of household and local context on the turnout of young people at a recent British general election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361212_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A number of recent studies have shown that age is a prominent predictor of turnout at the individual level, with the youngest sections of the electorate being the most likely to opt out of voting. However, few if any British studies have provided a reliable estimate of turnout among young people. Moreover, models of young people and voting often neglect the importance of the household, local and political context. This paper addresses these limitations in the literature. First it uses evidence from a random sample of marked registers at the 2001 general election to provide a reliable estimate of participation among those young people who are eligible to vote for the first time in an election. Second, it employs a multilevel logistic model design to examine the effects of household and local context (including party mobilisation) on influencing the extent to which young people, eligible to vote for the first time, turnout in elections. The model also includes a proxy for election-specific factors at the higher level to reflect the theory that young people who are eligible to vote for the first time may be particularly sensitive to such factors as they have yet to acquire the habit or indeed the non-habit of voting.

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